Wednesday, 30 July 2014

NEW BOOK OF THE MONTH - The Rise of UKIP

Our Readers Panel have chosen as Book of the Month for August
The Rise of Ukip by Bill Etheridge MEP

Written by a key insider and UKIP activist, this book takes a look at the rise of this ground breaking political party that threatens to overthrow the conventional face of British Politics.
This book covers both the history of UKIP from its birth amid the turbulent Parliamentary debates over the Maastricht Treaty in the 1990s and an analysis of the party’s current mass appeal.
In 1997, four years after forming the United Kingdom Independence Party, Alan Sked resigned as it’s Party leader claiming that they were “doomed to remain on the political fringes.” Having been formed to focus national opposition to the Maastricht Treaty, UKIP had failed to make any real impression in it’s first standing at a General Election
Two years later, at the European Elections of 1999, UKIP produced three MEPs. One of whom, a Mr Nigel Farage, would go on to lead a Party which has risen to unanticipated heights over the course of the last 12 months.
2012 became the year when UKIP grew to become the third most supported Political Party in Britain. In 2013 UKIP came close to capturing its first parliamentary seat in a by-election and topped the opinion polls for the first time. As the European elections of 2014 loom this book seeks to answer the questions about UKIP being asked by voters, pundits and politicians alike.

Contents
Introduction
Chapter 1 - Before the Rise
Chapter 2 - The Reasons for the Rise
Chapter 3 - The Rise Begins
Chapter 4 - 2012 – A Year of Promise
Chapter 5 - The By-Election Surge
Chapter 6 - 2013 Trouble in the Tory shires
Chapter 7 - Polling Third, Coming First?
Conclusions
Acknowledgements 


Order your copy HERE

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Rise-UKIP-Bill-Etheridge/dp/1909698334/ref=sr_1_sc_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1406731670&sr=1-1-spell&keywords=rise+of+ukip+bill+etheridfe

CHAPTER SIX – SAM AT HOME

CHAPTER SIX – SAM AT HOME

Sam had been home for a week and it wasn’t getting much better.  He was glad to be out of hospital and trying to live a normal life again – but it wasn’t normal and it would never be again. He was a cripple – they told him not to say that word, but that was what he was. A cripple. He could not run, nor even walk nor stand up and his world was full of barriers now that were not barriers before, and weren’t barriers to other people. Stairs, steps, narrow doorways, rough steep ground – and cobbles – bloody cobbles and bloody high kerbs. Everything took more effort and more time; even getting up and going to bed. And worst of all, most of the boys he had thought were his friends simply couldn’t be bothered to wait for him or help him.
People had simply changed, mostly for the worse. Not his sister Sophie though. She was great. A year older than him, she used to be just silly or bossy and never thought about anything except girl things, but now she made time for him. She noticed when he needed help and did things without saying or making a fuss. Sophie was good.
But his mother hadn’t changed. He could never forgive her for leaving his father and he had always hoped she would go back home – to their real home with his father – but now she never could. Somehow she seemed sort of mechanical, Sam thought. She looked after him, got his meals and helped him with his clothes, but she didn’t seem to understand he was fourteen and didn’t want his mother dressing him. Anyway, he would have to learn to do things for himself and though it had been embarrassing at first, he would really rather ask Sophie for help if he needed it.
As for George – he had been a real surprise. He hadn’t liked George. He had stolen Sam’s mother from his father and broken up their home. And he was a teacher. And he was boring. Yet it was George who had fixed things. He seemed to understand what Sam needed. The house where they lived was quite old and a bit higgledy-piggeldy and George had always had the best room in the place as his study, but he had moved out and made it into a bed-sitting room for Sam.
Sam’s emotions still swung sharply – sometimes he was depressed and sad – he even wondered if life was worth living at all – and then suddenly something good happened and he was sure that he could overcome his injuries. It had not been easy on his first day back at school. He didn’t want people to be sorry for him, or treat him differently, but it would be nice if they didn’t let doors swing back in his face. Games were pretty awful. He knew he could cope with most things, but he was still glad to get home every day, just to get away from other people.
That day – the day Ben arrived at Canine Partners – was the day that George had told him about the break-in at Sam’s father’s flat.
“Look Sam,” George had said. “There is something you should know about your father.”
Sam felt a flash of anger. What business was it of George’s to tell him what he should know about his father? He almost told him to mind his own business – but then saw from George’s face that he was uncomfortable about it too.


from "Ben's Story" by Norman Tebbit
Get your copy HERE
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bens-Story-Norman-Tebbit/dp/1909698725/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404455768&sr=1-1&keywords=tebbit+ben%27s+story

Monday, 28 July 2014

NEW EBOOK - First Battles 1914

First Battles 1914

An ebook containing contemporary accounts of the first battles of the war, fought when the Austro-Hungarian Empire invade Serbia in August 1914. Complete with explanatory glossary and background.

The First World War broke out in the Balkans. When a Serb terrorist murdered Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Imperial Austro-Hungarian throne, the Austrians saw it as an ideal opportunity to crush the Kingdom of Serbia. The Austrian invasion would spark the outbreak of a general European war, but is itself usually ignored by historians. Here contemporary accounts of the Austrian invasion are reproduced, along with an introductory note and an explanatory glossary by historian Leonard James.
This ebook is a must for anyone seeking to understand more about the First World War.


Contents
Introductory note by Leonard James
Chapter 1 Background
Chapter 2 The Austrian Offensive
Glossary


About the Author

Leonard James has written dozens of books, mostly on history or military subjects for a wide audience. He is uniquely placed to analyse and comment upon the accounts used in the “Eyewitness World War 1” series.

Get your copy HERE

http://www.amazon.co.uk/First-Battles-Annotated-Illustrated-Eyewitness-ebook/dp/B00KAGGT3G/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1406535530&sr=1-1&keywords=bretwalda+first+battles

Sunday, 27 July 2014

CHAPTER SIXTEEN – THE TRAP IS MADE AND BAITED

CHAPTER SIXTEEN – THE TRAP IS MADE AND BAITED

Sam was pleased with his mobile ‘phone, even if – as his mother had guessed – Ben was a bit put out that he couldn’t use it.
However, it helped to keep Sam from thinking too much about the visit to his father’s flat. Ben, being a dog – even if a very smart dog – found it quite hard to think about things several days ahead in the future and simply got on with his job of looking after Sam.
Between them they had most things quite well sorted out. Ben had learned the school routine very well and made sure that Sam had his school bag on the back of his chair and that no-one mucked it about. One or two boys had tried that and backed off pretty smartly when Ben grabbed them firmly by their jacket, trousers or even their hand.
Alice was also thinking hard, not just about the visit to the flat, but how to trap Sir John and deliver him to the police, so she had plenty to do.
Jack Riley had spent a day with his old friends in the Drugs Squad at Scotland Yard.  To his relief he found that although the Squad had been reorganised he knew several of the people in charge of hunting down the drug racketeers.
As he told Alice that evening, it was just like old times.
“We are in luck” he explained. “They know quite a lot about Sir John and a bit about how he uses the legal company that imports and exports wheat and barley and that sort of stuff as a cover for the drugs business, but they don’t know enough to arrest him, get him convicted and sent to prison for the drugs offences, let alone for murder and they certainly don’t know enough to pick up the people who work for him. In fact they have not listed Sam’s father’s death as murder – let alone that Sir John was the killer.
What’s more – the people who work for him are too scared to talk to the police, especially the ones who do know what happened to Sam’s father.
Anyway, the police are pretty keen to help us, but they dare not take part in fooling him into giving himself away. You remember what it is like. The big boys in the drugs trade can afford the most expensive lawyers who can wreck a prosecution case in court if the police have, as the lawyers call it, ‘obtained evidence by deception’.
Fortunately, we aren’t the police and we are not acting under their instructions. They don’t even have to know quite what we are up to.
All we have to worry about is making sure that sir John doesn’t outsmart us and that Sam doesn’t get hurt.”
As usual, Alice was thinking hard. She raised one hand and Jack paused as she cut in.
“Yes. We talked about that the other night. You didn’t like my idea of telling Sir John we had got the car he used to push Sam’s father’s car off the road. Well, I’ve thought of a way to do that, but I’ve got something even better here.”



from "Ben's Story" by Norman Tebbit

Get your copy HERE




http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bens-Story-Norman-Tebbit/dp/1909698725/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404455768&sr=1-1&keywords=tebbit+ben%27s+story

Saturday, 26 July 2014

EBOOK - Time To Jump - A Positive Vision of a Britain Out of the EU and In EEA Lite [Kindle Edition]

EBOOK  - Time To Jump - A Positive Vision of a Britain Out of the EU and In EEA Lite [Kindle Edition]

Product Description
Foreword by Norman Lamont - former Chancellor of the Exchequer
A timely, populist and controversial book that explains in an easy to understand and chatty style what problems face Britain in the UK and how they can be solved.
In this book, controversial Member of the European Parliament David Campbell Bannerman puts forward a radical and creative alternative to UK membership of the European Union.
Unlike many dry political tracts, this book takes a lively and engaging look at the awkward and dangerous position Britain has got itself into. Drawing on his background in the real world outside of politics - as a leading communications strategist across industry, commerce and government - Campbell Bannerman explains in easy to understand terms and with a chatty writing style exactly how it is possible to leave the EU, why the UK must leave and what we would do instead and what the benefits and freedoms outside the EU are.
With the help of carefully gathered facts, figures, quotes and opinions, Campbell Bannerman argues it is time for Britain to Jump out of the EU and into a position that he has dubbed “EEA Lite”. This is a groundbreaking proposal positioned between the EEA Agreement that Norway enjoys and Swiss bilateral trade arrangements. He charts how Britain could take the EEA as a working basis and lighten it up to suit Britain’s unique strengths and needs. He sees the UK leaving the EU Single Market, but retain full access to it for UK exporters for the 8% of the UK economy trading with the EU. The 92% of the UK economy has nothing to do with EU trade, but is still forced to apply its laws will be liberated from billions in red tape. EEA Lite will allow the UK to bring in Swiss-style tougher visa-based immigration controls for EU national and to negotiate its own UK trade deals and to re-embrace the Commonwealth.
David paints a picture of the UK as a new Singapore sitting off Europe, but thinking globally.


About the Author
David Campbell Bannerman has had a rich and varied career. Born in India he has been a Government Special Adviser on the Northern Ireland Peace Process working closely with Number 10, a Conservative Parliamentary Candidate and councillor, was elected a UKIP MEP in 2009, was Chairman and Deputy Leader
of UKIP, a communications professional, a leading policy writer and Chairman of the Tory Bow Group think tank and is now a Conservative MEP for the East of England. David is based out of Cambridge.

Get your kindle copy HERE
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Time-Jump-Positive-Vision-Britain-ebook/dp/B00HNXJ1Q6/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1406364459&sr=1-2&keywords=bretwalda+time+to+jump

Friday, 25 July 2014

CHAPTER FOUR – CANINE PARTNERS

CHAPTER FOUR – CANINE PARTNERS

At 8 o’clock the next morning Clive Baker was turning out of his drive and heading for Exeter grumbling to himself about the rush hour traffic. However much he tried not to keep asking himself why a lost dog in Exeter had his name on his collar his mind kept coming back to that question. What was it the police officer had said – he was “a very smart dog.”
Well, thought Clive, if he is, then wherever he has come from, perhaps he could be trained as a “canine partner.”
There was never a shortage of disabled people of all kinds who needed a trained dog to help them, and now his old friend, Shah, the senior consultant at the Stoke Mandeville spinal injuries hospital had asked if he could find a dog for Sam Pearson. Sam was fourteen years old. His parents had parted and Shah had told him that as if that was not bad enough, his father had been killed in a car crash which had left Sam paralysed from his waist down. “He needs a friend – a real friend that he can always trust,” Shah had said. “The people in his life have let him down. He needs a dog - one of your dogs - and he needs it now because he is leaving hospital very soon and he feels very lost and lonely.”
It was all very well for Shah to say the boy needed a dog, but dogs take time to train and every dog at Canine Partners anywhere near ready to start work was already allocated to someone. But perhaps if Ben really was smart, he was the answer. After all, what had the old lady, Miss Hanson, told him? That the dog had come from Russia to Exeter, met up with an old lady and landed up as a lost dog in the police station?
After a while Clive Baker gave up asking himself questions he could not possibly answer and got on with his journey to Exeter.
It was not quite 11 o’clock as he turned off the A30 into Exeter and followed the signs to the police station.
For some reason he felt slightly nervous as he walked up to the desk and asked for PC Hudson.
“Yes,” said the clerk. “Can I tell him what it is about?”
“Of course. I’ve come to collect a lost dog.  My name is Baker.”
The clerk’s face lit up. “Oh, you mean Ben – he’s a lovely dog – but however did he get all the way here from Midhurst – it must be one hundred and fifty miles?”
One hundred and fifty miles – if Miss Hanson was right, it was more like three or four thousand miles, thought Clive Baker, but he kept the thought to himself and just smiled.
“Well, that is a mystery I must say,” he observed. “But where is Ben now?”
“Right here, under PC Hudson’s desk,” replied the clerk. “Hi Ben – your master’s here.”
Ben had been listening carefully to make sure he didn’t make a mistake. He had been working out how he would recognise Clive Baker and how he would greet him. Now was the time to do it. Out from under the desk, paws up on the counter (he couldn’t jump over it because of the glass screen) and Ben let out a series of half barks, half whoops of welcome, looking straight into Clive Baker’s eyes.
By now PC Hudson had arrived and opened the door to let Clive Baker into the office, but Ben was too quick for him and in a moment was through the door, standing up on his back legs and paws on Clive’s chest to give him a big licking.
“Well,” said Hudson. “I don’t have to ask if you two know each other.” Just as well, thought Clive – and so did Ben, who dropped down onto all four paws and then sat at heel by Clive’s right side.
Within a few minutes the paperwork was done. Ben had barked his thanks to PC Hudson, wagged his tail and followed Clive out of the door, along the road and into the back of his car. Clive turned in his seat and looked at the dog.



from "Ben's Story" By Norman Tebbit
Get your copy HERE




http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bens-Story-Norman-Tebbit/dp/1909698725/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1404455768&sr=1-1&keywords=tebbit+ben%27s+story

Thursday, 24 July 2014

EBOOK - The Rise of UKIP

Written by a key insider and UKIP activist, this book takes a look at the rise of this ground breaking political party that threatens to overthrow the conventional face of British Politics.
This book covers both the history of UKIP from its birth amid the turbulent Parliamentary debates over the Maastricht Treaty in the 1990s and an analysis of the party’s current mass appeal.
In 1997, four years after forming the United Kingdom Independence Party, Alan Sked resigned as it’s Party leader claiming that they were “doomed to remain on the political fringes.” Having been formed to focus national opposition to the Maastricht Treaty, UKIP had failed to make any real impression in it’s first standing at a General Election
Two years later, at the European Elections of 1999, UKIP produced three MEPs. One of whom, a Mr Nigel Farage, would go on to lead a Party which has risen to unanticipated heights over the course of the last 12 months.
2012 became the year when UKIP grew to become the third most supported Political Party in Britain. In 2013 UKIP came close to capturing its first parliamentary seat in a by-election and topped the opinion polls for the first time. As the European elections of 2014 loom this book seeks to answer the questions about UKIP being asked by voters, pundits and politicians alike.

Contents
Introduction
Chapter 1 - Before the Rise
Chapter 2 - The Reasons for the Rise
Chapter 3 - The Rise Begins
Chapter 4 - 2012 – A Year of Promise
Chapter 5 - The By-Election Surge
Chapter 6 - 2013 Trouble in the Tory shires
Chapter 7 - Polling Third, Coming First?
Conclusions
Acknowledgements


Get your copy HERE
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Rise-UKIP-Bill-Etheridge-ebook/dp/B00JJ5NP4A/ref=sr_1_1_bnp_1_kin?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1406189867&sr=1-1&keywords=bretwalda+ukip