Friday, 28 November 2014

Another cathedral, another murder (1079)


History repeats itself. Almost a century before Thomas Becket was assassinated in Canterbury Cathedral, something very similar happened a thousand miles away in southern Poland. The victim on this occasion was Stanislaus of Szczepanów, who was the Archbishop of Kraków – a post held nine centuries later by Karol Wojtyła, who went on to become Pope John Paul II.
Like Karol Wojtyła, Stanislaus of Szczepanów found himself in conflict with the government of his time. In Wojtyła’s case it was the Communists – with Stanislaus it was King Bolesław the Bold. Being bold, the King didn’t waste time dropping subtle hints the way Henry II did a hundred years later. He went straight to Kraków Cathedral and dealt with the matter personally. He slew the archbishop as he was celebrating mass, and hacked his body into pieces.
As with Becket, the murder didn’t prove as universally popular as Bolesław might have hoped. He was ousted from power later the same year, and forced to flee the country... while Stanislaus was made a saint.

from "Conspiracy History" by Andrew May
Get your copy HERE




http://www.amazon.co.uk/Conspiracy-History-World-Theorists/dp/1909698873/ref=sr_1_1_twi_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1417172516&sr=1-1&keywords=bretwalda+conspiracy

The Discerning Gentleman’s Guide to His Majesty’s Fractious North American Colonies; People to Visit and Places to Bombard - Launch Event

video

The Past, as they say, is Another Country. Now there is a guide book to North America as it was during Revolutionary Times. Written by Dr Lee Rotherham this book tells the modern reader everything they would need to know when visiting North America 250 years ago.
Written as if it were a guide book to be used by a visiting European, and illustrated, this book is the essential guidebook to Revolutionary America.
Satisfied user Charles James Fox says “A gentleman is taught never to run. He might make an exception when pursued by a band of Cree warriors after his scalp. And why should you be wary of accepting an invitation to a tea party in Boston, why might you want to find some fur; why are the rebel colonies rebelling; why should you watch your watch when you meet George Washington, and just what is the correct etiquette for using a dessert spoon in a log cabin? The essential visitor’s guide.”
So this handbook is part survival guide, part tome to assist in cultural acclimatisation, part aide-memoire to help manage expectations in what remains a frontier land.
The book contains added War of 1812  bicentenary flavouring and is being launched to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the writing of “The Star Spangled Banner”.

About the Author
Dr Lee Rotherham is an historian with two postgraduate degrees on Québec. His survival skills were honed by idly wandering around Montréal during its worst winter on record. An army reservist, it’s thus appropriate that from his dealings with the Canadian Armed Forces he is a Member of the Order of Good Cheer/L’Ordre du Bon Temps. This is a Nova Scotia fraternity, originally set up by Samuel de Champlain, which commemorates the terrible winters of the first colonists and the social environment that got them through it. With beer, his accent betrays an alarming French Canadian twang.

CONTENTS
Foreword by Charles James Fox
An Introduction for Tourists
Chapter 1 - Planning Your Visit
Chapter 2 - The Politics of Revolt
Chapter 3 - Information for Business Visitors
Chapter 4 - Culture and Social Mores
Chapter 5 - The Revolution at a Glance
Chapter 6 - Meet and Greet
Chapter 7 - Where to Visit
Appendix 1  - Pocket Timeline
Appendix 2 - A Word Before You Leave
Appendix 3 - Acknowledgements and Further Study
About the Author

Wednesday, 26 November 2014

Soviet war machines, British technology (1946)

Soviet war machines, British technology (1946)
The MiG-15 was the first really successful jet fighter, fielded in huge numbers by the Soviet Union and its allies during the late 1940s and early 50s. The plane’s success was down to its combination of a first-class airframe, designed by the Mikoyan-Gurevich Bureau of Moscow, and a first-class engine, designed by the Rolls-Royce company of Derby, England.
When the Second World War ended in 1945, the Russians were lagging a long way behind Britain and America in jet technology. The following year the British Prime Minister, Clement Attlee, presented the Soviet Union with a fully functional Rolls-Royce Nene turbojet, complete with permission to produce it under licence, by way of thanks for the support the Soviets had given to Britain during the War.
In light of the subsequent polarization of the Cold War – which saw America and Britain on one side and Russia on the other – Attlee’s behaviour may appear to border on treason. But that wasn’t the case at the time. The Russians had been wartime allies of Britain just as much as the Americans had, and in political terms Attlee’s Labour Party was poised midway between Soviet-style communism and American-style capitalism. That was little consolation four years later, however, when British pilots found themselves up against the MiG-15 in the Korean War!

from "Conspiracy History" by Andrew May

Get your copy HERE




http://www.amazon.co.uk/Conspiracy-History-World-Theorists/dp/1909698873/ref=sr_1_1_twi_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1417008501&sr=1-1&keywords=bretwalda+conspiracy

Monday, 24 November 2014

NEW BOOK - The 'Dispossessed', the 'Never-Possessed' and the 'Bastards' - Debunking Major's Myths of the Eurosceptics



Euroscepticism within the Conservative Party has been growing steadily since the Maastricth Rebellion of 1993. And yet the lessons of those turbulent months have yet to be learned properly. This book sets out clearly the reasons why some MPs rebelled and others did not - and points the way to the future.

In 1993 the Maastricht Rebellion tore apart John Major’s Conservative Government. An ever-shifting group of Eurosceptic rebels consumed hours of Parliamentary time, derailed legislation and brought the government to the brink of collapse. Major denounced the rebels as the 'Dispossessed', the 'Never-Possessed' and the 'Bastards'.
This paper rebuts the myths about the Maastricht rebels.
With Prime Minister Cameron's proposed renegotiation and referendum on EU membership set to take place in 2017 recognising the factors affecting MPs' willingness to defy the party line is vital. Should Cameron secure re-election at the head of a minority or slim-majority government, the ensuing Europe debate within the Conservative Party is likely to be even more divisive than Maastricht. Understanding MPs' behaviour on Europe will allow the pro-withdrawal faction to assess the optimum methods of convincing MPs to side with them, as well as how to counter the Europhile faction's attempts to poach their followers. The purpose of this work is therefore to act as a case study for newer Eurosceptic MPs to study.


Friday, 21 November 2014

Kaspar Hauser (1828)


Kaspar Hauser (1828)
In May 1828, a boy of about 17 appeared out of nowhere in the town of Nuremberg in Germany. He said his name was Kaspar Hauser, but that was virtually the only useful information he could provide. An anonymous letter he was carrying stated that Kaspar had been put in the writer’s care as a baby on 7 October 1812, and that since that time he had been brought up in virtual isolation from the outside world.
The story of Kaspar Hauser caused a sensation at the time. Some people accused him of being an attention-seeking fraud, while others took his story at face value. He stuck to it doggedly for five years, until he was stabbed to death by person or persons unknown. His mysterious murder, and his strangely secretive upbringing, led many people to speculate that he was the child of a noble family that someone wanted out of the way.
One possibility is that Kaspar was the Grand Duke of Baden’s son, who had been born on 29 September 1812 and supposedly died a few weeks later. The theory is that, rather than dying, the boy was abducted and imprisoned. If this was true, then Kaspar should have inherited the dukedom when his father died in 1818. As it was, though, the title passed sideways to another branch of the family. One of the chief beneficiaries was the Countess of Hochberg, who many people consider the most likely suspect in the case. Recent DNA tests have given tantalizing hints of a link between Kaspar Hauser and the Baden family.

from "Conspiracy History" by Andrew May





Preface by Nick Redfern

JFK, the Bilderberg Group and the New World Order – conspiracy theories abound on today’s internet, but they are nothing new. Taking a long-term view reveals century after century of covert conspiracies, murder plots and political intrigues. The history of the world is riddled with hidden agendas, scheming politicians and secretive organisations.

Did the U.S. government fake the 9/11 terror attacks? Was the British establishment behind the death of Diana, Princess of Wales? Conspiracy theories like these may be a modern phenomenon, but the basic idea – that world events are controlled by cynically duplicitous schemers – is as old as history. When the heir to the English throne died in 1120, they said it was an accident – but it was an accident from which certain people benefited a great deal. When the Nazis invaded Poland in 1939, it was in response to blatant Polish aggression... which just happened to be the work of Nazi soldiers dressed in Polish uniforms. As Niccolò Machiavelli said 500 years ago, “the end justifies the means”. History is often dismissed as a dull subject, but it leaps into all-too-contemporary life when seen through the eyes of a Conspiracy Theorist! This fast-paced account tells you everything you need to know about the convenient accidents, false flag operations and hidden agendas that have shaped the course of history.

CONTENTS

Preface by Nick Redfern

Chapter 1: A brief introduction to conspiracy theories

Chapter 2: False flag incidents

Chapter 3: They acted alone - or did they?

Chapter 4: Hidden agendas

Chapter 5: Convenient deaths

Chapter 6: Secret identities

Chapter 7: The Illuminati and others

Chapter 8: Rewriting history

Chapter 9: Chronology of Conspiracy

About the Author
Andrew May is a former defence scientist with an MA from Cambridge University and a PhD from Manchester University. His thirty year career spanned academia, the civil service and the defence industry. He has worked on advanced technology research in Farnborough, strategic planning in Whitehall and operational analysis for a large defence company. He is now based in the South-West of England where he works as a freelance writer and consultant.


 

Thursday, 20 November 2014

NEW BOOK - A Dinosaur's Guide to Libertarianism








Get your paperback copy HERE

A book that lays bare the failings of the British political establishmenet and sysem, penned by a famously robust critic of the European Union and its politically correct tyranny.
I have been called “a dinosaur” more times than I can remember - usually by some politically correct policy wonk who can’t be bothered to debate the issues and prefers to insult his opponents. Nothing wrong with dinosaurs. They dominated Earth for over 120 million years. Political correctness has managed 15 years so far.
Classical liberalism and libertarianism is the only possible salvation for mankind, it looks to the future not the past.
This book is about why we are governed or why we are governed in the hopelessly inefficient, corrupt and incompetent way we are. It contains more questions than answers yet I make no apology for that. I believe in the English speaking world in the last hundred years we have stopped asking appropriate questions, without which we can never find answers, right or wrong.

About the Author
Godfrey Bloom is a financial economist who served as a UKIP Member of the European Parliament from 2004 to 2013. He was born in south London and was educated at his local grammar school. Bloom was a co-author of Wolfson Prize Economics Submission with Professor Pat Barron and Professor Philipp Bagus. He warned that credit agencies would be "castrated" by too much regulation of the EU. In the 1990s he was part of the British government’s regulatory consultancy panel. Never one to shy away from controversy, Bloom was ejected from London’s Mansion House in 2009 for heckling Lord Turner for giving staff bonuses - thus becoming the first man to be ejected since John Wilkes in the late-18th century.

Tuesday, 18 November 2014

A Young Pretender


A young pretender (1487)
Ten years before Perkin Warbeck’s rebellion, Henry VII had to deal with another pretender to the throne. This was a rather different situation, though. Warbeck, whether he was an impostor or the real thing, was the instigator of his own rebellion. In the earlier case, however, the claimant to the throne was a ten year old boy named Lambert Simnel. He was just a puppet in the affair, selected because his facial features resembled those of the royal family. The brains behind the plot was Simnel’s tutor – a man named Richard Symonds. He tried to pass the young boy off as a nephew of Richard III, who had a stronger claim to the throne that Henry VII himself.
Symonds managed to pull together a sizeable army to support his claim, but they were defeated at the Battle of Stoke Field in June 1487. Henry VII doesn’t seem to have taken this attempt on his throne very seriously, though – Richard Symonds was merely imprisoned, not executed, while the young Lambert Simnel was given a job in the King’s service.

 from "Conspiracy History" by Andrew May

Get your copy HERE

Preface by Nick Redfern

JFK, the Bilderberg Group and the New World Order – conspiracy theories abound on today’s internet, but they are nothing new. Taking a long-term view reveals century after century of covert conspiracies, murder plots and political intrigues. The history of the world is riddled with hidden agendas, scheming politicians and secretive organisations.

Did the U.S. government fake the 9/11 terror attacks? Was the British establishment behind the death of Diana, Princess of Wales? Conspiracy theories like these may be a modern phenomenon, but the basic idea – that world events are controlled by cynically duplicitous schemers – is as old as history. When the heir to the English throne died in 1120, they said it was an accident – but it was an accident from which certain people benefited a great deal. When the Nazis invaded Poland in 1939, it was in response to blatant Polish aggression... which just happened to be the work of Nazi soldiers dressed in Polish uniforms. As Niccolò Machiavelli said 500 years ago, “the end justifies the means”. History is often dismissed as a dull subject, but it leaps into all-too-contemporary life when seen through the eyes of a Conspiracy Theorist! This fast-paced account tells you everything you need to know about the convenient accidents, false flag operations and hidden agendas that have shaped the course of history.

CONTENTS

Preface by Nick Redfern

Chapter 1: A brief introduction to conspiracy theories

Chapter 2: False flag incidents

Chapter 3: They acted alone - or did they?

Chapter 4: Hidden agendas

Chapter 5: Convenient deaths

Chapter 6: Secret identities

Chapter 7: The Illuminati and others

Chapter 8: Rewriting history

Chapter 9: Chronology of Conspiracy

About the Author
Andrew May is a former defence scientist with an MA from Cambridge University and a PhD from Manchester University. His thirty year career spanned academia, the civil service and the defence industry. He has worked on advanced technology research in Farnborough, strategic planning in Whitehall and operational analysis for a large defence company. He is now based in the South-West of England where he works as a freelance writer and consultant.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Conspiracy-History-World-Theorists/dp/1909698873/ref=sr_1_1_twi_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1416038335&sr=1-1&keywords=bretwalda+conspiracy